Ep #128: Empowerment Philosophy with Byron de Marse

Discover the world of empowerment flow yoga with Byron, who illuminates the journey of connecting with one’s inner self through understanding chakras and koshas. Byron breaks down the complexity of energy systems, emphasizing how chakras, the energy centers of the body, correlate with human qualities and nature. They delve into the transformative power of aligning with these energies, particularly highlighting the heart chakra’s role in fostering gratitude and balanced relationships.
Byron shares personal insights into meditation and the symbolism of chakra colors, revealing how societal beliefs can shape our understanding of these concepts. They introduce the Upanishads, ancient texts that inspire a deeper connection with nature and self, urging a contemplative approach to yoga that extends beyond physical practice.

The discussion goes further into the philosophy of yoga, advocating for introspection and questioning that can lead to profound personal growth. By integrating yoga principles, individuals can achieve a better understanding of themselves and enhance their everyday communication and decision-making.
Listeners are invited to explore the deeper aspects of life and self through yoga, as Byron presents a holistic view that merges physical, mental, and spiritual realms, encouraging a journey of self-discovery and empowerment. This conversation opens a pathway to deeper understanding and personal transformation, urging listeners to engage with their inner selves in a meaningful way.

Episode Chapters:

  • 00:00 – The Importance of Energy in Yoga: Chakras and Koshas
  • 03:25 – The Significance of the Seven Chakras in Yoga
  • 05:00 – The Significance of the Seven Chakras in Your Body
  • 07:38 – The Importance of Chakras in Yoga
  • 10:42 – The Meaning and Power of Chakras
  • 13:25 – Colors and Chakras: Our Individual Journey
  • 15:02 – The Importance of the Upanishads in the Yoga World
  • 18:02 – Dialogue with Oneself: The Importance of Deep Questions
  • 20:53 – Movement of Energy in Yoga Philosophy
  • 23:56 – The Practice of Empowerment through Communication
  • 26:19 – The Five Layers of the Body: Yoga Philosophy Explained
  • 28:44 – Integrating Art and Ancient Systems in Yoga Classes
  • 31:46 – The Power of Communication and Permission in Lived Spirituality
  • 33:49 – Confrontation and Growth in the Yoga Class
  • 36:56 – The Importance of Understanding Introductions
  • 39:42 – The Importance of Combining Emotion and Logic in Decision-Making
  • 44:25 – Yoga: The Art of Storytelling with Ancient Philosophy
  • 48:00 – Training on Empowerment Flow in Bali – Details and Opportunities

Discover the world of empowerment flow yoga with Byron, who illuminates the journey of connecting with one’s inner self through understanding chakras and koshas. Byron breaks down the complexity of energy systems, emphasizing how chakras, the energy centers of the body, correlate with human qualities and nature. They delve into the transformative power of aligning with these energies, particularly highlighting the heart chakra’s role in fostering gratitude and balanced relationships.
Byron shares personal insights into meditation and the symbolism of chakra colors, revealing how societal beliefs can shape our understanding of these concepts. They introduce the Upanishads, ancient texts that inspire a deeper connection with nature and self, urging a contemplative approach to yoga that extends beyond physical practice.

The discussion goes further into the philosophy of yoga, advocating for introspection and questioning that can lead to profound personal growth. By integrating yoga principles, individuals can achieve a better understanding of themselves and enhance their everyday communication and decision-making.
Listeners are invited to explore the deeper aspects of life and self through yoga, as Byron presents a holistic view that merges physical, mental, and spiritual realms, encouraging a journey of self-discovery and empowerment. This conversation opens a pathway to deeper understanding and personal transformation, urging listeners to engage with their inner selves in a meaningful way.

Episode Chapters:

  • 00:00 – The Importance of Energy in Yoga: Chakras and Koshas
  • 03:25 – The Significance of the Seven Chakras in Yoga
  • 05:00 – The Significance of the Seven Chakras in Your Body
  • 07:38 – The Importance of Chakras in Yoga
  • 10:42 – The Meaning and Power of Chakras
  • 13:25 – Colors and Chakras: Our Individual Journey
  • 15:02 – The Importance of the Upanishads in the Yoga World
  • 18:02 – Dialogue with Oneself: The Importance of Deep Questions
  • 20:53 – Movement of Energy in Yoga Philosophy
  • 23:56 – The Practice of Empowerment through Communication
  • 26:19 – The Five Layers of the Body: Yoga Philosophy Explained
  • 28:44 – Integrating Art and Ancient Systems in Yoga Classes
  • 31:46 – The Power of Communication and Permission in Lived Spirituality
  • 33:49 – Confrontation and Growth in the Yoga Class
  • 36:56 – The Importance of Understanding Introductions
  • 39:42 – The Importance of Combining Emotion and Logic in Decision-Making
  • 44:25 – Yoga: The Art of Storytelling with Ancient Philosophy
  • 48:00 – Training on Empowerment Flow in Bali – Details and Opportunities

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Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the mid-line of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Back Arm Line (BAL)

The Back Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consist of the Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL) and the Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL).

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist. 

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL)

This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into adduction or extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: wrist flexors, biceps, pectoralis minor

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Muscle areas of the back line include: triceps, rotator cuff muscles of external rotation and rhomboids.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm .

Front Arm Lines (FAL)

The Front Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consists of the Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL) and the Superficial Front Arm Line (SFAL).

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion. This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The SFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, flexion, and protraction. This fascial line runs from the clavicle, through the inner biceps, and into the front forearm area.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into abduction, adduction in combination with flexion or extension.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the multifidus along the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull just under the chin.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: inner thigh muscles, the hip flexors (Psoas), the deep core including Quadratus Lumborum (QL), and the transversus abdominus.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

Assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the muscles on the front and sides of the shins, the muscles on the side of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the side abdominals (obliques), and the spinal muscles on each side of the neck.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

Assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the shins, the quadriceps, the abdomens, the diaphragm and the muscles in the front of the neck.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spinal muscles.

Priority #1-2 Cues – Movement into Pose combined with Adjusting Common Misalignments:

This yoga pose is more complex and requires a combination of action cues to stabilize the body before moving into the full expression of the pose.

Action cues are subtle movements in that establish stability to support the posture and protect the body.

Priority #3 Cues – Finishing Touches:

Used for the final touches of the pose. These are the last things you would say after a student has entered the pose (#1) and established alignment(#2).

Priority #2 Cues – Adjust Common Misalignments:

Used to adjust common misalignment in the body by providing action cues. Action cues are subtle movements in that establish stability to support the posture and protect the body.

Priority #1 Cues – Movement into the Pose:

Used to move the student(s) into the pose. These cues are the first thing to say to guide movement into the posture. These cues are necessary for beginners.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

 

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Priority #3 Cues – Soft Finishing Touches:

Used for the final touches of the pose. These are the last things you would say after a student has safely entered the pose to reconnect with their breath, to create awareness, and to relax their body

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the mid-line of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

Assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the shins, the quadriceps, the abdomens, the diaphragm and the muscles in the front of the neck.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spinal muscles.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm .

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

Assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the muscles on the front and sides of the shins, the muscles on the side of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the side abdominals (obliques), and the spinal muscles on each side of the neck.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: inner thigh muscles, the hip flexors (Psoas), the deep core including Quadratus Lumborum (QL), and the transversus abdominus.

Front Arm Lines (FAL)

The Front Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consists of the Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL) and the Superficial Front Arm Line (SFAL).

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion. This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The SFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, flexion, and protraction. This fascial line runs from the clavicle, through the inner biceps, and into the front forearm area.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into abduction, adduction in combination with flexion or extension.

Back Arm Line (BAL)

The Back Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consist of the Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL) and the Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL).

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Muscle areas of the back line include: triceps, rotator cuff muscles of external rotation and rhomboids.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Priority #1-2 Cues – Movement into Pose/Gentle stability:

Used to move the student(s) into the pose. These cues are the first thing to say to guide movement into the posture combine with occasionally cues for action to stabilize and protect the body.

Action cues are subtle movements in that establish stability to support the posture and protect the body.

These cues are necessary for beginners.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL)

This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into adduction or extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: wrist flexors, biceps, pectoralis minor

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist. 

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the multifidus along the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull just under the chin.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

 

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Level 1 pose: Safe to perform in the average body and can be added to the beginning, middle or end of a sequence. No warm up needed.

Level 2 pose: Requires one or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up, or activated, using a level 1 pose. These postures are recommended after the warm up to the middle/end of a sequence.

Level 3 pose: Requires two or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up or activated, using a level 1 or level 2 pose. These postures are recommended for middle to end of a sequence.

View on “More” tab: Warm up poses for this posture

*Yoga Pose Levels are based on what’s accessible for the average modern body.

Sanskrit Cheat Sheet
Adhodownward
Agnifire
Anandahappiness or bliss
Angalimb
Anghustabig toe
Apanadescending energy
Ardhahalf
Asanapose/ posture
Ashtaeight
Baddhatied/ bound
Bakacrane
Balayoung, powerful, child-like
Bhadrafortune, or auspicious
Bharmatable
Bhujaarm
Bhujangasnake/ serpent
Bitila/Gocow
Camatsurprised, proud
Chandramoon
Chaturfour
Dandarod/ staff
Dandayamanabalancing
Dhanubow
Dvijasanaborn twice
Dwitwo, both
Ekaone
Galavadevotion
Halaplough
HanumanMonkey king
Hastahand
Indralord or king
Januknee
Kakacrow
Kapotapigeon/ dove
KaraHand
Karnaear
Konaangle
Kurmaturtle
Loladangling
Malagarland or prayer beads
Mandukfrog
Marjaracat
Matsyafish
Mudraseal
Mukhaface
Natadancer
Navaboat

Ep #128: Empowerment Philosophy with Byron de Marse

Nirlambawithout support
Padafoot/ leg
PadmaLotus
Parighagate latch
Parivrttarevolved
ParsvaSide
Paschimawest direction (back of body)
PhalakaShield, holding
Pidapressure
Pranabreath/ lifeforce
PrapaBegin to drink, prayer
Prasaritaspread out
Pristhaback or rear
Purvaeast direction (front of body)
Rajaking
Salambawith support
Sarvangawhole body
Savacorpse
Setubridge
Shalabhalocust/ grasshopper
Shishopuppy
Sirsahead
Skandatrunk, stem or bulk of quanitity
Stambhapillar or column
Sthitistability
Sukhaeasy
Suptareclining/ sleeping
Suryasun
Svanadog
Svargaheaven
Tadamountain
Tittibhasmall insect
Trithree
Upavisthaseated
Urdvaraised/ upward
Ustracamel
Utkatafierce, proud, superior, difficult
Uttanaintense stretch
Utthitaextended, stretched.
VajraThunderbolt
Vakrabent
Vasisthawealthy
ViparitaReverse
Virahero
Vrksatree
Vrschikascorpion
Vyaghratiger
Sanskrit Cheat Sheet
Adhodownward
Agnifire
Anandahappiness or bliss
Angalimb
Anghustabig toe
Apanadescending energy
Ardhahalf
Asanapose/ posture
Ashtaeight
Baddhatied/ bound
Bakacrane
Balayoung, powerful, child-like
Bhadrafortune, or auspicious
Bharmatable
Bhujaarm
Bhujangasnake/ serpent
Bitila/Gocow
Camatsurprised, proud
Chandramoon
Chaturfour
Dandarod/ staff
Dandayamanabalancing
Dhanubow
Dvijasanaborn twice
Dwitwo, both
Ekaone
Galavadevotion
Halaplough
HanumanMonkey king
Hastahand
Indralord or king
Januknee
Kakacrow
Kapotapigeon/ dove
KaraHand
Karnaear
Konaangle
Kurmaturtle
Loladangling
Malagarland or prayer beads
Mandukfrog
Marjaracat
Matsyafish
Mudraseal
Mukhaface
Natadancer
Navaboat

Ep #128: Empowerment Philosophy with Byron de Marse

Nirlambawithout support
Padafoot/ leg
PadmaLotus
Parighagate latch
Parivrttarevolved
ParsvaSide
Paschimawest direction (back of body)
PhalakaShield, holding
Pidapressure
Pranabreath/ lifeforce
PrapaBegin to drink, prayer
Prasaritaspread out
Pristhaback or rear
Purvaeast direction (front of body)
Rajaking
Salambawith support
Sarvangawhole body
Savacorpse
Setubridge
Shalabhalocust/ grasshopper
Shishopuppy
Sirsahead
Skandatrunk, stem or bulk of quanitity
Stambhapillar or column
Sthitistability
Sukhaeasy
Suptareclining/ sleeping
Suryasun
Svanadog
Svargaheaven
Tadamountain
Tittibhasmall insect
Trithree
Upavisthaseated
Urdvaraised/ upward
Ustracamel
Utkatafierce, proud, superior, difficult
Uttanaintense stretch
Utthitaextended, stretched.
VajraThunderbolt
Vakrabent
Vasisthawealthy
ViparitaReverse
Virahero
Vrksatree
Vrschikascorpion
Vyaghratiger

Level 1 pose: Safe to perform in the average body and can be added to the beginning, middle or end of a sequence. No warm up needed.

Level 2 pose: Requires one or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up, or activated, using a level 1 pose. These postures are recommended after the warm up to the middle/end of a sequence.

Level 3 pose: Requires two or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up or activated, using a level 1 or level 2 pose. These postures are recommended for middle to end of a sequence.

View on “More” tab: Warm up poses for this posture

*Yoga Pose Levels are based on what’s accessible for the average modern body.