Elements of Power Yoga Presents:

EXPRESSIONS OF POWER

50hr Hands-on Adjustments and Accelerated Skills Training

With Byron de Marse and Michael Henri

Apr 1-5th, 2024 – Yoga Union, Ubud, Bali – SOLD OUT

Oct 21-25th, 2024 – Yoga Barn, Ubud, Bali

 

 

Yoga Teacher Skills for Your Resume and Your Career

The expressions of power 50HR teacher training is about learning skills to share yoga through the power of touch, communication and presence.

Led by senior teacher Byron de Marse, with over 10,000 hours of teaching experience, and Michael Henri, Manual Physiotherapist and Yoga Teacher, with over 10 years experience.

We’ll help you master skills to enhance your ability to share yoga, plus the self-confidence and ability to deliver an experience that is repeatable. This transformational experience will teach you new ways of being and discover tools to fast-track your personal growth.

In this 50HR Training You Will Learn...

  • Anatomical Alignment
  • Safe and effective adjustments
  • The art of verbal communication
  • Expressions of voice, rhythm and timing
  • Precision cueing
  • Trauma informed yoga
  • Supportive language skills
  • Authentic relating through connection, community and play

Is This Training Right For You?

Expressions of Power 50HR Teacher Training is for yoga teachers who want to move beyond the basics and level up their skills to offer a unique experience to others.

Expressions of Power is right for you if...

Here's What You'll Get

Whether you’re looking to turn your passion for yoga into a career, or just want to experience more in your life day-to-day, Expressions of Power can help. This 5-day, 50-hour, in-person training provides an experience to learn new hands-on skills and practical techniques, while exploring the elements of your human potential.

Mastery

Peace of mind that you’re learning research backed skills that offer…

Confidence​

Feel good about your practice and improve your presence, voice and strength in communicating.

Depth​

An immersive, in-person, supportive learning environment to experience growth.

WHAT YOU'LL LEARN​

THE CORE CURRICULUM

There are five core learning modules, plus a comprehensive manual of poses and interactive activities to help you develop the skills to become a great yoga teacher and build a sustainable business of it. 

Power of Touch

Power of Intention

Power of Receptivity

Power of Expression

Power of Flow

The Power of Touch can be a transformational part of any yoga practice, but not all yoga teachers are trained to do it safely.

You will learn the proper and safe way to adjust many of the yoga poses that exist today including both standing and seated poses, to enhance the experience and to help others with finding their optimal alignment.

The Power of Intention is an intelligence we all possess that is limited by the perception of failure, rejection and making mistakes. 

You will learn to develop the courage to do the thing that you are scared to do. We all have this capability, and you too can access this intelligence and grow it beyond measure.

The Power of Receptivity is one of the highest vibrations that a human can experience, and often lacking in most due to the temptation to critique, judge and advise.

You will learn the art of deliberate listening to becoming open to truths. We cultivate the ability to withhold judgment and criticism and become present with others, and ourselves.

The Power of Expression means using emotions and matching energetic tone of a room to deliver an experience worth listening to.

Learn the skills to verbally communicate effectively and accurately so that what you share can land with those receiving it. Not only to cue movements and alignments but to also develop your own communication skills through voice, rhythm, timing, pacing, and silence.

The Power of Flow is the ability to trust yourself and know that what you already know is enough.

You will learn the skill to access your life experiences through a stream of consciousness, where we connect with our intuition and feel confident with creativity without cognitive dissonance, interruption, or “getting stuck”.

PLUS: 12-months access to the Going Pro Yoga Platform ($396 value)

This incredible library of yoga cueing and done-for-you sequencing chunks make it easy to create classes that are challenging and safe so you can confidently help others practice yoga no matter if they are beginners or yoga pros. 

It’s specifically designed to teach you how to build classes with connection, to assist students using the most effective cues, and instill confidence in your ability to really look at who’s in the room and speak to what you see, rather than in generalized terms that most new yoga teachers are forced to rely upon.

When you register for the 100hr Expressions of Power Training, you’ll get 12 months to GOING PRO YOGA for free! Meaning, you’ll receive access to everything you need to build your confidence in becoming a TOP yoga teacher. Including…

DAILY SCHEDULE​

A TYPICAL TRAINING DAY

We’ll start a typical day with a sunrise yoga practice. Checking in with ourselves, setting intentions and letting our breath and body build our daily foundation. After practice you’ll enjoy a healthy light fruit breakfast in silent reflection. We return for a riveting morning lecture, followed by a short break before proceeding to a group activity/exercise. After a 90-minute lunch break we’ll return to lecture, workshops or teaching practice with an afternoon break in between.

BEGIN

7:00 AM
8:30AM
9:00AM
10:45 AM
11:00 AM
12:00 PM
1:30 PM
3:30 PM
4:00 PM

END

8:30 AM
9:00 AM
10:45 AM
11:00 AM
12:00 PM
1:30 PM
3:30 PM
4:00 PM
6:00 PM

ACTIVITY

Yoga Practice
Morning Break
Lecture – Prac
Lunch Break
Activity /Game
Lunch
Lecture – Prac
Afternoon Break
Workshop

ACTIVITY

Yoga Practice
Morning Break
Lecture – Practicum
Morning Break
Group Activity /Game
Lunch
Lecture – Practicum
Afternoon Break
Workshop

This 50-hour teacher training is Yoga Alliance certified and can be applied toward your 300 hour advanced certification. See FAQ below for more details.

About Your Trainers​

Byron de Marse (E-RYT 500)

Byron’s journey began on an Oklahoma cattle ranch where he learned the benefits of hard work and discipline. He credits his humble approach to life and present dharma to a wide array of experiences, which eventually brought him to yoga. After becoming certified under Travis Eliot in 2010, he taught at Bryan Kest’s world famous Power Yoga studio for nine years. He continued his education with Schuyler Grant of Wanderlust, and has more than 10,000 hours of teaching experience.

His Vinyasa classes are dynamic, physically rigorous, heart opening, and designed to help others listen better through verbal guidance and enhanced precision cueing. Stressing proper alignment, mindfulness of physical limits, awareness of breath, and using inner inquiry, Byron’s classes suit different levels of practitioners, offering modifications for newcomers and advanced instruction for seasoned yogis.

Yoga has dramatically improved Byron’s physical wellness and has helped him develop strong mental and emotional stability. He believes that anyone with a consistent yoga practice will experience an increase in well-being, and possibly inspire you to live beyond what you currently think is possible.

Michael Henri (RYT 500, MPthy, BHK)

Michael is a highly experienced Physiotherapist and yoga teacher from Canada who has worked in public and private practices, hospitals, and orthopedic clinics in several countries all over the world.

Michael received his 200 HR certification through the Elements of Power Yoga school, studying under Paul Teodo, Byron De Marse, and Leah Santa Cruz in 2020. Upon completion, he immediately started working alongside his teachers and mentors to create a curriculum to support yoga teachers in teaching safely and effectively.

He is the creator and co-founder of Going Pro Yoga. Michael is committed to integrating functional anatomy into the  practice of yoga so that alignment, cueing and sequencing makes sense and can be more easily remembered and understood.

His teaching style is simple, useful, and to the point. He filters through the unnecessary by teaching you only what you need to know. He will enhance your experience by further developing your sense of body awareness, and will allow you to explore your limitations while at the same time respecting them.

Tuition

Course tuition includes lunches and fruit platters, daily yoga, course materials and all course activities

Early bird: $798 USD (Register early and save $200)

Standard Price: $998 USD

RESERVE YOUR SPOT

$ 375
  • Includes Daily Lunch and Fruit Platters
  • Tuition fees
  • Course materials
  • Yoga Alliance certifcation

EARLY BIRD PRICE

$ 798
  • Includes Daily Lunch and Fruit Platters
  • Tuition fees
  • Course materials
  • Yoga Alliance certification

TRAINING ONLY

$748.00
$898.00

SECURE YOUR SPOT BY PAYING IN FULL

$745 USD Early-bird price!

Save $150 if you register now. After that, it will be the standard price of $895.

50-hour teacher training. Includes 2 meals per day + daily yoga.

Accommodation, flights and transportation to Ubud, Bali not included

PRIVATE ROOM

$898 $1048

$350 US reserves your spot.

Non-refundable deposit can be used for any of our trainings in the future should you need to cancel for any reason.

50-hour teacher training. Includes accommodate for 5 days; 2x meals per day + daily yoga.

 Flights and transportation to Ubud, Bali not included

Pay in Full
$745.00 $895.00

SECURE YOUR SPOT BY PAYING IN FULL

$745 USD Early-bird price until August 15th!

Save $150 if you register now. After that, it will be the standard price of $895.

50-hour teacher training includes daily yoga.

Accommodation, flights and transportation are not included

frequently asked questions

You must attend 90% of the live sessions and complete all of the videos. The duration of the 50hr training is 5 days.

If you complete all 300 hours with our school, you will be eligible for a 300hr advanced yoga alliance certification.

After completing this training, you can combine these 50hrs with an additional 250 hrs of advanced training by Byron de Marse, Michael Henri, Paul Teodo, Leah Santa Cruz or a reputable school or teacher that we can review. Then you can receive the 300 hr advanced certification with YA.

We will be in the heart of the cultural center of Bali – Ubud.

Soak up the jungle vibes to the sounds of water falling and tropical birds in this yoga and meditation oasis.

Nearby us are several natural waterfalls, hiking trails, water temples, rice patty fields, and treasures to explore!

The mountain village town of Ubud is bustling with local markets, the monkey forest, and plenty of amazing places to eat and stay.

We are 45 minutes from Canggu and 1.5hrs from Uluwatu. The drive from the airport is approx. 45min – 1hr.

If you would like assistance with pickup from the airport please let us know and we can help you arrange a driver.

All insurances (incl. health and travel) are the responsibility of the participants.

Teachers and assistants shall not be held liable for any damage, or loss of property or injury to persons.

Some of our students like to insure their investment in their travel and take precautions in case of accident, covid, illness or injury. Here’s the travel insurance we recommend – WorldNomad or InsureMyTrip. Carefully review what’s covered in each option.

**If you want coverage to reimburse you for the travel costs in case you have to cancel for any reason, use InsureMyTrip and find “cancel for any reason” insurance using the filters…Note: you’ll have to book that insurance within 2 weeks of making your initial deposit in order to qualify.

We can accommodate most diet types. The majority of our meals will be vegetarian and organic. If you have a dairy or gluten allergy, there will be options provided for you.

Water and juice fasting are not recommended during the training.

If you have injuries or any other conditions that require special needs, please indicate in the application form upon registration. This will automatically appear during your checkout process.

Send us an email or a whatsapp message if you have any doubts or want to discuss further if this is the right training for you.

We’d also love to hear from you if you’re interested in attending but have any questions about payment.

Email us at: info@goingproyoga.com

or whatsapp: +62 821-4642-8127

frequently asked questions

You must attend 90% of the live sessions and complete all of the videos. The duration of the 50hr training is 5 days.

If you complete all 300 hours with our school, you will be eligible for a 300hr advanced yoga alliance certification.

After completing this training, you can combine these 50hrs with an additional 250 hrs of advanced training by Byron de Marse, Michael Henri, Paul Teodo, Leah Santa Cruz or a reputable school or teacher that we can review. Then you can receive the 300 hr advanced certification with YA.

We will be in the heart of the cultural center of Bali – Ubud.

Soak up the jungle vibes to the sounds of water falling and tropical birds in this yoga and meditation oasis.

Nearby us are several natural waterfalls, hiking trails, water temples, rice patty fields, and treasures to explore!

The mountain village town of Ubud is bustling with local markets, the monkey forest, and plenty of amazing places to eat and stay.

We are 45 minutes from Canggu and 1.5hrs from Uluwatu. The drive from the airport is approx. 45min – 1hr.

If you would like assistance with pickup from the airport please let us know and we can help you arrange a driver.

Accommodation is only included if you’ve selected “Double Room Shared” or “Private Room.”

Otherwise, places to stay can be checked at, Airbnb, Momondo, Agoda, or Booking.com.

There are many very affordable options in the area. Just look at places surrounding Ubud, Bali.

If you need assistance, please reach out.

All insurances (incl. health and travel) are the responsibility of the participants.

Teachers and assistants shall not be held liable for any damage, or loss of property or injury to persons.

Some of our students like to insure their investment in their travel and take precautions in case of accident, covid, illness or injury. Here’s the travel insurance we recommend – WorldNomad or InsureMyTrip. Carefully review what’s covered in each option.

**If you want coverage to reimburse you for the travel costs in case you have to cancel for any reason, use InsureMyTrip and find “cancel for any reason” insurance using the filters…Note: you’ll have to book that insurance within 2 weeks of making your initial deposit in order to qualify.

We can accommodate most diet types. The majority of our meals will be vegetarian and organic. If you have a dairy or gluten allergy, there will be options provided for you.

Water and juice fasting are not recommended during the training.

If you have injuries or any other conditions that require special needs, please indicate in the application form upon registration. This will automatically appear during your checkout process.

Send us an email or a whatsapp message if you have any doubts or want to discuss further if this is the right training for you.

We’d also love to hear from you if you’re interested in attending but have any questions about payment.

Email us at: info@goingproyoga.com

or whatsapp: +62 821-4642-8127

Each pose has multiple benefits, but we highlight the Primary Benefit to indicate its main purpose. This helps focus cueing more specifically and effectively towards achieving this benefit.

Additionally, it helps us understand how the pose prepares specific areas of the body for more challenging Level 2 or Level 3 postures.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm .

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the multifidus along the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull just under the chin.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

 

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist. 

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL)

This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into adduction or extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: wrist flexors, biceps, pectoralis minor

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Muscle areas of the back line include: triceps, rotator cuff muscles of external rotation and rhomboids.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Back Arm Line (BAL)

The Back Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consist of the Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL) and the Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL).

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Priority #1-2 Cues – Movement into Pose/Gentle stability:

Used to move the student(s) into the pose. These cues are the first thing to say to guide movement into the posture combine with occasionally cues for action to stabilize and protect the body.

Action cues are subtle movements in that establish stability to support the posture and protect the body.

These cues are necessary for beginners.

Front Arm Lines (FAL)

The Front Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consists of the Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL) and the Superficial Front Arm Line (SFAL).

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion. This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The SFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, flexion, and protraction. This fascial line runs from the clavicle, through the inner biceps, and into the front forearm area.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into abduction, adduction in combination with flexion or extension.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: inner thigh muscles, the hip flexors (Psoas), the deep core including Quadratus Lumborum (QL), and the transversus abdominus.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

Assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the muscles on the front and sides of the shins, the muscles on the side of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the side abdominals (obliques), and the spinal muscles on each side of the neck.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

Assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the shins, the quadriceps, the abdomens, the diaphragm and the muscles in the front of the neck.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spinal muscles.

Priority #1-2 Cues – Movement into Pose combined with Adjusting Common Misalignments:

This yoga pose is more complex and requires a combination of action cues to stabilize the body before moving into the full expression of the pose.

Action cues are subtle movements in that establish stability to support the posture and protect the body.

Priority #3 Cues – Finishing Touches:

Used for the final touches of the pose. These are the last things you would say after a student has entered the pose (#1) and established alignment(#2).

Priority #2 Cues – Adjust Common Misalignments:

Used to adjust common misalignment in the body by providing action cues. Action cues are subtle movements in that establish stability to support the posture and protect the body.

Priority #1 Cues – Movement into the Pose:

Used to move the student(s) into the pose. These cues are the first thing to say to guide movement into the posture. These cues are necessary for beginners.

Priority #3 Cues – Soft Finishing Touches:

Used for the final touches of the pose. These are the last things you would say after a student has safely entered the pose to reconnect with their breath, to create awareness, and to relax their body

Sanskrit Cheat Sheet
Adhodownward
Agnifire
Anandahappiness or bliss
Angalimb
Anghustabig toe
Apanadescending energy
Ardhahalf
Asanapose/ posture
Ashtaeight
Baddhatied/ bound
Bakacrane
Balayoung, powerful, child-like
Bhadrafortune, or auspicious
Bharmatable
Bhujaarm
Bhujangasnake/ serpent
Bitila/Gocow
Camatsurprised, proud
Chandramoon
Chaturfour
Dandarod/ staff
Dandayamanabalancing
Dhanubow
Dvijasanaborn twice
Dwitwo, both
Ekaone
Galavadevotion
Halaplough
HanumanMonkey king
Hastahand
Indralord or king
Januknee
Kakacrow
Kapotapigeon/ dove
KaraHand
Karnaear
Konaangle
Kurmaturtle
Loladangling
Malagarland or prayer beads
Mandukfrog
Marjaracat
Matsyafish
Mudraseal
Mukhaface
Natadancer
Navaboat

Home

Nirlambawithout support
Padafoot/ leg
PadmaLotus
Parighagate latch
Parivrttarevolved
ParsvaSide
Paschimawest direction (back of body)
PhalakaShield, holding
Pidapressure
Pranabreath/ lifeforce
PrapaBegin to drink, prayer
Prasaritaspread out
Pristhaback or rear
Purvaeast direction (front of body)
Rajaking
Salambawith support
Sarvangawhole body
Savacorpse
Setubridge
Shalabhalocust/ grasshopper
Shishopuppy
Sirsahead
Skandatrunk, stem or bulk of quanitity
Stambhapillar or column
Sthitistability
Sukhaeasy
Suptareclining/ sleeping
Suryasun
Svanadog
Svargaheaven
Tadamountain
Tittibhasmall insect
Trithree
Upavisthaseated
Urdvaraised/ upward
Ustracamel
Utkatafierce, proud, superior, difficult
Uttanaintense stretch
Utthitaextended, stretched.
VajraThunderbolt
Vakrabent
Vasisthawealthy
ViparitaReverse
Virahero
Vrksatree
Vrschikascorpion
Vyaghratiger

**Modifications: Adjustments made to a yoga posture
to suit the needs and abilities of the practitioner. Modifications can make a pose more accessible for beginners, individuals with injuries, or those with limited flexibility or strength.

**Variations: Alternative versions of a yoga posture that will either increase the challenge or level of intensity and can also help to target specific areas of the body more effectively.

Front Arm Lines (FAL)

The Front Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consists of the Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL) and the Superficial Front Arm Line (SFAL).

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion. This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The SFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, flexion, and protraction. This fascial line runs from the clavicle, through the inner biceps, and into the front forearm area.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into abduction, adduction in combination with flexion or extension.

To safely perform any Level 2 or Level 3 poses, specific warm-ups are required:

Stretch involves lengthening muscles and connective tissues to increase flexibility and range of motion.

Activate refers to engaging and recruiting specific muscles to prepare them for movement or pose.

When the (2X) label is present, at least two different poses, or exercises, are needed to adequately prepare the muscles. Can be applied to either stretching or activating.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the mid-line of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the mid-line of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

Assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the shins, the quadriceps, the abdomens, the diaphragm and the muscles in the front of the neck.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spinal muscles.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm .

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

Assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the muscles on the front and sides of the shins, the muscles on the side of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the side abdominals (obliques), and the spinal muscles on each side of the neck.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: inner thigh muscles, the hip flexors (Psoas), the deep core including Quadratus Lumborum (QL), and the transversus abdominus.

Back Arm Line (BAL)

The Back Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consist of the Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL) and the Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL).

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Sanskrit Cheat Sheet
Adhodownward
Agnifire
Anandahappiness or bliss
Angalimb
Anghustabig toe
Apanadescending energy
Ardhahalf
Asanapose/ posture
Ashtaeight
Baddhatied/ bound
Bakacrane
Balayoung, powerful, child-like
Bhadrafortune, or auspicious
Bharmatable
Bhujaarm
Bhujangasnake/ serpent
Bitila/Gocow
Camatsurprised, proud
Chandramoon
Chaturfour
Dandarod/ staff
Dandayamanabalancing
Dhanubow
Dvijasanaborn twice
Dwitwo, both
Ekaone
Galavadevotion
Halaplough
HanumanMonkey king
Hastahand
Indralord or king
Januknee
Kakacrow
Kapotapigeon/ dove
KaraHand
Karnaear
Konaangle
Kurmaturtle
Loladangling
Malagarland or prayer beads
Mandukfrog
Marjaracat
Matsyafish
Mudraseal
Mukhaface
Natadancer
Navaboat

Home

Nirlambawithout support
Padafoot/ leg
PadmaLotus
Parighagate latch
Parivrttarevolved
ParsvaSide
Paschimawest direction (back of body)
PhalakaShield, holding
Pidapressure
Pranabreath/ lifeforce
PrapaBegin to drink, prayer
Prasaritaspread out
Pristhaback or rear
Purvaeast direction (front of body)
Rajaking
Salambawith support
Sarvangawhole body
Savacorpse
Setubridge
Shalabhalocust/ grasshopper
Shishopuppy
Sirsahead
Skandatrunk, stem or bulk of quanitity
Stambhapillar or column
Sthitistability
Sukhaeasy
Suptareclining/ sleeping
Suryasun
Svanadog
Svargaheaven
Tadamountain
Tittibhasmall insect
Trithree
Upavisthaseated
Urdvaraised/ upward
Ustracamel
Utkatafierce, proud, superior, difficult
Uttanaintense stretch
Utthitaextended, stretched.
VajraThunderbolt
Vakrabent
Vasisthawealthy
ViparitaReverse
Virahero
Vrksatree
Vrschikascorpion
Vyaghratiger

Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Muscle areas of the back line include: triceps, rotator cuff muscles of external rotation and rhomboids.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL)

This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into adduction or extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: wrist flexors, biceps, pectoralis minor

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist. 

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the multifidus along the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull just under the chin.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

 

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Level 1 pose: Safe to perform in the average body and can be added to the beginning, middle or end of a sequence. No warm up needed.

Level 2 pose: Requires one or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up, or activated, using a level 1 pose. These postures are recommended after the warm up to the middle/end of a sequence.

Level 3 pose: Requires two or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up or activated, using a level 1 or level 2 pose. These postures are recommended for middle to end of a sequence.

View on “More” tab: Warm up poses for this posture

*Yoga Pose Levels are based on what’s accessible for the average modern body.

Level 1 pose: Safe to perform in the average body and can be added to the beginning, middle or end of a sequence. No warm up needed.

Level 2 pose: Requires one or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up, or activated, using a level 1 pose. These postures are recommended after the warm up to the middle/end of a sequence.

Level 3 pose: Requires two or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up or activated, using a level 1 or level 2 pose. These postures are recommended for middle to end of a sequence.

View on “More” tab: Warm up poses for this posture

*Yoga Pose Levels are based on what’s accessible for the average modern body.