Privacy Policy

Canadian Global Consultants (“Company,” “we,” or “us”) respects your privacy and is committed to protecting it through this Privacy Policy.

This Privacy Policy governs your access to and use of https://www.goingproyoga.com including any content, functionality and services offered on or through https://www.goingproyoga.com/ (the “Websites“), whether as a guest or a registered user.

When accessing the Website, the Company will learn certain information about you, both automatically and through voluntary actions you may take, during your visit. This policy applies to information we collect on the Website and in email, text, or other electronic messages between you and the Website.

Please read the Privacy Policy carefully before you start to use the Website. By using the Website or by clicking to accept or agree to the Terms of Use when this option is made available to you, you accept and agree to be bound and abide by the Privacy Policy. If you do not want to agree to the Privacy Policy, you must not access or use the Website.

Children Under The Age Of 13

Our Website is not intended for children under 13 years of age. No one under age 13 may provide any information to or on the Website. We do not knowingly collect personal information from children under 13. If you are under 13, do not use or provide any information on this Website or on or through any of its features/register on the Website, make any purchases through the Website, use any of the interactive or public comment features of this Website or provide any information about yourself to us, including your name, address, telephone number, email address, or any screen name or user name you may use.

If we learn we have collected or received personal information from a child under 13 without verification of parental consent, we will delete that information. If you believe we might have any information from or about a child under 13, please contact us at info[at]goingproyoga[dot]com.

Information We Collect About You

When you access the Website, the Company will learn certain information about you during your visit.

Information You Provide To Us. The Website provides various places for users to provide information. We collect information that users provide by filling out forms on the Website, communicating with us via contact forms, responding to surveys, search queries on our search feature, providing comments or other feedback, social media, SMS and messaging interactions and providing information when ordering a product or service via the Website.

We use information you provide to us to deliver the requested product and/or service, to improve our overall performance, and to provide you with offers, promotions, and information.

Information We Collect Through Automatic Data Collection Technology. As you navigate through our Website, we may use automatic data collection technologies including Google Analytics to collect certain information about your equipment, browsing actions, and patterns. This will generally include information about your location, your traffic pattern through our website, and any communications between your computer and our Website.  Among other things, we will collect data about the type of computer you use, your Internet connection, your IP address, your operating system, and your browser type.

The information we collect automatically is used for statistical data and will not include personal information. We use this data to improve our Website and our service offerings. To the extent that you voluntarily provide personal information to us, our systems will associate the automatically collected information with your personal information.

Use of Cookies And Pixels

Similar to other commercial websites, our website utilizes a standard technology called “cookies” and server logs to collect information about how our site is used. Information gathered through cookies and server logs may include the date and time of visits, the pages viewed, time spent at our site, and the websites visited just before and just after our own, as well as your IP address.

A cookie is a very small text document, which often includes an anonymous unique identifier. When you visit a website, that site’s computer asks your computer for permission to store this file in a part of your hard drive specifically designated for cookies. Each website can send its own cookie to your browser if your browser’s preferences allow it, but (to protect your privacy) your browser only permits a website to access the cookies it has already sent to you, not the cookies sent to you by other sites.

The Company reserves the right to use technological equivalents of cookies, including social media pixels. These pixels allow social media sites to track visitors to outside websites so as to tailor advertising messages users see while visiting that social media website. The Company reserves the right to use these pixels in compliance with the policies of the various social media sites.​

Third Party Use Of Cookies

Some content or applications, including advertisements, on the Website are served by third-parties, including advertisers, ad networks and servers, content providers, and application providers. These third parties may use cookies alone or in conjunction with web beacons or other tracking technologies to collect information about you when you use our websites. The information they collect may be associated with your personal information or they may collect information, including personal information, about your online activities over time and across different websites and other online services. They may use this information to provide you with interest-based (behavioral) advertising or other targeted content.

We do not control these third parties’ tracking technologies or how they may be used. If you have any questions about an advertisement or other targeted content, you should contact the responsible provider directly.

Electronic Communications Information

If you choose to correspond with us through email, SMS or digital messenger (“Electronic Communications”), we may retain the content of your messages together with your email address, phone number or user name and our responses. We provide the same protections for these Electronic Communications that we employ in the maintenance of information received online, mail, and telephone. This also applies when you register for our websites, sign up through any of our forms using your email address or make a purchase on this site. For further information see the email policies below.

Email Policies

We are committed to keeping your e-mail address confidential. We do not sell, rent, or lease our subscription lists to third parties, and will not disclose your email address to any third parties except as allowed in the section titled Disclosure of Your Information.

We will maintain the information you send via e-mail in accordance with applicable federal law.

In compliance with the CAN-SPAM Act, all e-mails sent from our organization will clearly state who the e-mail is from and provide clear information on how to contact the sender. In addition, all e-mail messages will also contain concise information on how to remove yourself from our mailing list so that you receive no further e-mail communication from us.

Our emails provide users the opportunity to opt-out of receiving communications from us and our partners by reading the unsubscribe instructions located at the bottom of any e-mail they receive from us at anytime.

Users who no longer wish to receive our newsletter or promotional materials may opt-out of receiving these communications by clicking on the unsubscribe link in the e-mail.

How And Why We Collect Information

The Company collects your information in order to record and support your participation in the activities you select. If you register to download a book or resources, sign up for our newsletter, and/or purchase a product from us, we collect your information. We use this information to track your preferences and to keep you informed about the products and services you have selected to receive and any related products and/or services. As a visitor to this Website, you can engage in most activities without providing any personal information. It is only when you seek to download resources and/or register for services that you are required to provide information.

If you are outside the European Union and opt to receive any free resources, participate in any free training programs, register for a webinar, register for a live event, register for a seminar, or purchase any products sold by the Company on this Website, we will automatically enroll ​you to receive our free email newsletter. If you do not wish to receive this newsletter, you can unsubscribe anytime. We include an “unsubscribe” link at the bottom of every email we send. If you ever have trouble unsubscribing, you can send an email to info[at]goingproyoga[dot]com requesting to unsubscribe from future emails.

If you are in the European Union and opt to receive any free resources, participate in any free training programs, register for a webinar, register for a live event, register for a seminar, or purchase any products sold by the Company on this Website, we will only enroll ​you to receive our free email newsletter if you affirmatively consent to it. If you do not wish to receive this newsletter, you can unsubscribe anytime. We include an “unsubscribe” link at the bottom of every email we send. If you ever have trouble unsubscribing, you can send an email to info[at]goingproyoga[dot]com requesting to unsubscribe from future emails.

How Do We Use the Information That You Provide to Us?

We use personal information for purposes of presenting our Website and its contents to you, providing you with information, providing you with offers for products and services, providing you with information about your subscriptions and products, carrying out any contract between you and the Company, administering our business activities, providing customer service, and making available other items and services to our customers and prospective customers.

From time-to-time, we may use the information you provide to us to make you offers to purchase products and services provided by third parties in exchange for a commission to be paid to us by such third parties. Should you opt to take part in such promotions, the third parties will receive your information.

From time-to-time, we may use the information you provide to us to display advertisements to you that are tailored to your personal characteristics, interests, and activities.

Disclosure Of Your Information

As a general rule, we do not sell, rent, lease or otherwise transfer any information collected whether automatically or through your voluntary action.

We may disclose your personal information to our subsidiaries, affiliates, and service providers for the purpose of providing our services to you.

We may disclose your personal information to a third party, including a lawyer or collection agency, when necessary to enforce our terms of service or any other agreement between you and the Company.

We may provide your information to any successor in interest in the event of a merger, divestiture, restructuring, reorganization, dissolution, or other sale or transfer of some or all of the Company’s asserts and/or business.

We may disclose information when legally compelled to do so, in other words, when we, in good faith, believe that the law requires it or for the protection of our legal rights or when compelled by a court or other governmental entity to do so.

How Do We Protect Your Information and Secure Information Transmissions?

We employ commercially reasonable methods to ensure the security of the information you provide to us and the information we collect automatically. This includes using standard security protocols and working only with reputable third-party vendors.

Email is not recognized as a secure medium of communication. For this reason, we request that you do not send private information to us by email. However, doing so is allowed, but at your own risk. Some of the information you may enter on our websites may be transmitted securely via a secure medium known as Secure Sockets Layer, or SSL. Credit Card information and other sensitive information is never transmitted via email.

The Company may use software programs to create summary statistics, which are used for such purposes as assessing the number of visitors to the different sections of our site, what information is of most and least interest, determining technical design specifications, and identifying system performance or problem areas.

For site security purposes and to ensure that this service remains available to all users, the Company uses software programs to monitor network traffic to identify unauthorized attempts to upload or change information, or otherwise cause damage.

Policy Changes

It is our policy to post any changes we make to our privacy policy on this page. If we make material changes to how we treat our users’ personal information, we will notify you by email to the email address specified in your account and/or through a notice on the Website home page. The date the privacy policy was last revised is identified at the bottom of the page. You are responsible for ensuring we have an up-to-date active and deliverable email address for you, and for periodically visiting our Website and this privacy policy to check for any changes.

Visitors’ GDPR Rights

If you are within the European Union, you are entitled to certain information and have certain rights under the General Data Protection Regulation. Those rights include:

We will retain the information you choose to provide to us until the earlier of: (a) you asking us to delete the information, (b) our decision to cease using our existing data providers, or (c) the Company decides that the value in retaining the data is outweighed by the costs of retaining it.

You have the right to request access to your data that the Company stores and the rights to either rectify or erase your personal data.

You have the right to seek restrictions on the processing of your data.

You have the right to object to the processing of your data and the right to the portability of your data.

To the extent that you provided consent to the Company’s processing of your personal data, you have the right to withdraw that consent at any time, without affecting the lawfulness of processing based upon consent that occurred prior to your withdrawal of consent.

You have the right to lodge a complaint with a supervisory authority that has jurisdiction over issues related to the General Data Protection Regulation.

We require only the information that is reasonably required to enter into a contract with you. We will not require you to provide consent for any unnecessary processing as a condition of entering into a contract with us.

Contact Us

The Company welcomes your questions or comments regarding the Privacy Policy:

Canadian Global Consultants
Gedung Alamanda Lantai 5.
Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai No:67 Lingk. Kerthayasa
Kelurahan-Kedonganan Kec.Kuta- Kab. Badung-Bali

Email Address: michael[at]michaelhenri[dot]com

Effective as of June 14, 2022

Each pose has multiple benefits, but we highlight the Primary Benefit to indicate its main purpose. This helps focus cueing more specifically and effectively towards achieving this benefit.

Additionally, it helps us understand how the pose prepares specific areas of the body for more challenging Level 2 or Level 3 postures.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm .

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the multifidus along the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull just under the chin.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

 

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist. 

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL)

This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into adduction or extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: wrist flexors, biceps, pectoralis minor

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Muscle areas of the back line include: triceps, rotator cuff muscles of external rotation and rhomboids.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Back Arm Line (BAL)

The Back Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consist of the Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL) and the Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL).

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Priority #1-2 Cues – Movement into Pose/Gentle stability:

Used to move the student(s) into the pose. These cues are the first thing to say to guide movement into the posture combine with occasionally cues for action to stabilize and protect the body.

Action cues are subtle movements in that establish stability to support the posture and protect the body.

These cues are necessary for beginners.

Front Arm Lines (FAL)

The Front Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consists of the Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL) and the Superficial Front Arm Line (SFAL).

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion. This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The SFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, flexion, and protraction. This fascial line runs from the clavicle, through the inner biceps, and into the front forearm area.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into abduction, adduction in combination with flexion or extension.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: inner thigh muscles, the hip flexors (Psoas), the deep core including Quadratus Lumborum (QL), and the transversus abdominus.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

Assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the muscles on the front and sides of the shins, the muscles on the side of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the side abdominals (obliques), and the spinal muscles on each side of the neck.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

Assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the shins, the quadriceps, the abdomens, the diaphragm and the muscles in the front of the neck.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spinal muscles.

Priority #1-2 Cues – Movement into Pose combined with Adjusting Common Misalignments:

This yoga pose is more complex and requires a combination of action cues to stabilize the body before moving into the full expression of the pose.

Action cues are subtle movements in that establish stability to support the posture and protect the body.

Priority #3 Cues – Finishing Touches:

Used for the final touches of the pose. These are the last things you would say after a student has entered the pose (#1) and established alignment(#2).

Priority #2 Cues – Adjust Common Misalignments:

Used to adjust common misalignment in the body by providing action cues. Action cues are subtle movements in that establish stability to support the posture and protect the body.

Priority #1 Cues – Movement into the Pose:

Used to move the student(s) into the pose. These cues are the first thing to say to guide movement into the posture. These cues are necessary for beginners.

Priority #3 Cues – Soft Finishing Touches:

Used for the final touches of the pose. These are the last things you would say after a student has safely entered the pose to reconnect with their breath, to create awareness, and to relax their body

Sanskrit Cheat Sheet
Adhodownward
Agnifire
Anandahappiness or bliss
Angalimb
Anghustabig toe
Apanadescending energy
Ardhahalf
Asanapose/ posture
Ashtaeight
Baddhatied/ bound
Bakacrane
Balayoung, powerful, child-like
Bhadrafortune, or auspicious
Bharmatable
Bhujaarm
Bhujangasnake/ serpent
Bitila/Gocow
Camatsurprised, proud
Chandramoon
Chaturfour
Dandarod/ staff
Dandayamanabalancing
Dhanubow
Dvijasanaborn twice
Dwitwo, both
Ekaone
Galavadevotion
Halaplough
HanumanMonkey king
Hastahand
Indralord or king
Januknee
Kakacrow
Kapotapigeon/ dove
KaraHand
Karnaear
Konaangle
Kurmaturtle
Loladangling
Malagarland or prayer beads
Mandukfrog
Marjaracat
Matsyafish
Mudraseal
Mukhaface
Natadancer
Navaboat

Privacy Policy

Nirlambawithout support
Padafoot/ leg
PadmaLotus
Parighagate latch
Parivrttarevolved
ParsvaSide
Paschimawest direction (back of body)
PhalakaShield, holding
Pidapressure
Pranabreath/ lifeforce
PrapaBegin to drink, prayer
Prasaritaspread out
Pristhaback or rear
Purvaeast direction (front of body)
Rajaking
Salambawith support
Sarvangawhole body
Savacorpse
Setubridge
Shalabhalocust/ grasshopper
Shishopuppy
Sirsahead
Skandatrunk, stem or bulk of quanitity
Stambhapillar or column
Sthitistability
Sukhaeasy
Suptareclining/ sleeping
Suryasun
Svanadog
Svargaheaven
Tadamountain
Tittibhasmall insect
Trithree
Upavisthaseated
Urdvaraised/ upward
Ustracamel
Utkatafierce, proud, superior, difficult
Uttanaintense stretch
Utthitaextended, stretched.
VajraThunderbolt
Vakrabent
Vasisthawealthy
ViparitaReverse
Virahero
Vrksatree
Vrschikascorpion
Vyaghratiger

**Modifications: Adjustments made to a yoga posture
to suit the needs and abilities of the practitioner. Modifications can make a pose more accessible for beginners, individuals with injuries, or those with limited flexibility or strength.

**Variations: Alternative versions of a yoga posture that will either increase the challenge or level of intensity and can also help to target specific areas of the body more effectively.

Front Arm Lines (FAL)

The Front Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consists of the Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL) and the Superficial Front Arm Line (SFAL).

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion. This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The SFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, flexion, and protraction. This fascial line runs from the clavicle, through the inner biceps, and into the front forearm area.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into abduction, adduction in combination with flexion or extension.

To safely perform any Level 2 or Level 3 poses, specific warm-ups are required:

Stretch involves lengthening muscles and connective tissues to increase flexibility and range of motion.

Activate refers to engaging and recruiting specific muscles to prepare them for movement or pose.

When the (2X) label is present, at least two different poses, or exercises, are needed to adequately prepare the muscles. Can be applied to either stretching or activating.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the mid-line of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the mid-line of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

Assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the shins, the quadriceps, the abdomens, the diaphragm and the muscles in the front of the neck.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spinal muscles.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm .

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

Assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the muscles on the front and sides of the shins, the muscles on the side of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the side abdominals (obliques), and the spinal muscles on each side of the neck.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: inner thigh muscles, the hip flexors (Psoas), the deep core including Quadratus Lumborum (QL), and the transversus abdominus.

Back Arm Line (BAL)

The Back Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consist of the Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL) and the Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL).

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Sanskrit Cheat Sheet
Adhodownward
Agnifire
Anandahappiness or bliss
Angalimb
Anghustabig toe
Apanadescending energy
Ardhahalf
Asanapose/ posture
Ashtaeight
Baddhatied/ bound
Bakacrane
Balayoung, powerful, child-like
Bhadrafortune, or auspicious
Bharmatable
Bhujaarm
Bhujangasnake/ serpent
Bitila/Gocow
Camatsurprised, proud
Chandramoon
Chaturfour
Dandarod/ staff
Dandayamanabalancing
Dhanubow
Dvijasanaborn twice
Dwitwo, both
Ekaone
Galavadevotion
Halaplough
HanumanMonkey king
Hastahand
Indralord or king
Januknee
Kakacrow
Kapotapigeon/ dove
KaraHand
Karnaear
Konaangle
Kurmaturtle
Loladangling
Malagarland or prayer beads
Mandukfrog
Marjaracat
Matsyafish
Mudraseal
Mukhaface
Natadancer
Navaboat

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Nirlambawithout support
Padafoot/ leg
PadmaLotus
Parighagate latch
Parivrttarevolved
ParsvaSide
Paschimawest direction (back of body)
PhalakaShield, holding
Pidapressure
Pranabreath/ lifeforce
PrapaBegin to drink, prayer
Prasaritaspread out
Pristhaback or rear
Purvaeast direction (front of body)
Rajaking
Salambawith support
Sarvangawhole body
Savacorpse
Setubridge
Shalabhalocust/ grasshopper
Shishopuppy
Sirsahead
Skandatrunk, stem or bulk of quanitity
Stambhapillar or column
Sthitistability
Sukhaeasy
Suptareclining/ sleeping
Suryasun
Svanadog
Svargaheaven
Tadamountain
Tittibhasmall insect
Trithree
Upavisthaseated
Urdvaraised/ upward
Ustracamel
Utkatafierce, proud, superior, difficult
Uttanaintense stretch
Utthitaextended, stretched.
VajraThunderbolt
Vakrabent
Vasisthawealthy
ViparitaReverse
Virahero
Vrksatree
Vrschikascorpion
Vyaghratiger

Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Muscle areas of the back line include: triceps, rotator cuff muscles of external rotation and rhomboids.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL)

This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into adduction or extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: wrist flexors, biceps, pectoralis minor

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist. 

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the multifidus along the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull just under the chin.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

 

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Level 1 pose: Safe to perform in the average body and can be added to the beginning, middle or end of a sequence. No warm up needed.

Level 2 pose: Requires one or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up, or activated, using a level 1 pose. These postures are recommended after the warm up to the middle/end of a sequence.

Level 3 pose: Requires two or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up or activated, using a level 1 or level 2 pose. These postures are recommended for middle to end of a sequence.

View on “More” tab: Warm up poses for this posture

*Yoga Pose Levels are based on what’s accessible for the average modern body.

Level 1 pose: Safe to perform in the average body and can be added to the beginning, middle or end of a sequence. No warm up needed.

Level 2 pose: Requires one or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up, or activated, using a level 1 pose. These postures are recommended after the warm up to the middle/end of a sequence.

Level 3 pose: Requires two or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up or activated, using a level 1 or level 2 pose. These postures are recommended for middle to end of a sequence.

View on “More” tab: Warm up poses for this posture

*Yoga Pose Levels are based on what’s accessible for the average modern body.