Terms and Conditions

Please READ carefully, as this pertains to the Agreement of your registration with any of the products or services sold (sometimes referred to as Program) by Canadian Global Consultants (sometimes referred to as “Company”).
By purchasing our products, you (sometimes referred to as “Client”) agree to the following terms stated.

PROGRAM

Canadian Global Consultants agrees to provide course content, identified as an online course aid, to help Clients with taking steps towards improving their ability to teach yoga professionally . Client agrees to abide by all policies and procedures outlined in this Agreement as a condition of their participation in any of our programs.

DISCLAIMER

Client understands Michael Henri, Paul Teodo, Byron de Marsee and Canadian Global Consultants, is not an employee, agent, lawyer, doctor, manager, therapist, public relations or business manager, registered dietician, or financial analyst, psychotherapist, physical therapist or accountant. Client understands their participation in this program will not treat or diagnose any disease, illness, or ailment and if they should experience any such issues they should see their registered physician or other practitioner as determined by their own judgment.

Client understands that neither Michael Henri, Paul Teodo, Byron de Marsee, nor Company, has not promised, nor shall be obligated to, the following:

(1) Success in health improvements, results, and reduction of physical signs or symptoms.

(2) Provide assistance, as either coach or mentor, with consultations for future health related issues developed by Client.

(3) Procure any publicity, social media exposure, interviews, write-ups, features, television, or print promotions for the Client.

(4) Introduce Client to Michael’s full network of contacts, media, or business partners. Client understands that a relationship does not exist between the Parties after the conclusion of this program.

FINANCIAL OBLIGATION

Client is responsible for the completion of all payment plans associated with products they purchase. We reserve the right to seek recovery of any monies remaining unpaid via our Collection Agency.

METHODS OF PAYMENT

We accept Visa, Mastercard, and American Express through Paypal Checkout as a form of payment. If Client chooses to pay by monthly installments, he/she authorizes the monthly charge for the product on the Client`s credit card or debit card.

REFUNDS

We DO NOT offer refunds on our programs. You may transfer your payment to another training or retreat, or to a friend.

Please note: If you opted for a payment plan, you are required by law to complete your payment plan. We reserve the right to seek recovery of any monies remaining unpaid via our Collection Agency.

Please note:

All returns and refunds are discretionary as determined by Canadian Global Consultants If you have any questions, contact us at info[at]goingproyoga[dot]com.

As mentioned above, all returns are discretionary. If you just downloaded the Training Material (PDFs, audios, videos, additional workbooks, and/or etc.), and then promptly asked for a return, we reserve the right to deny your request. Why? Because the point of the policy is to give people the chance to try the system, and if it doesn’t work, they can get their money back. It wasn’t designed to enable people to steal the Training Material.

CONFIDENTIALITY

Canadian Global Consultants respects Clients’ privacy and insists that the Client respects ours as well. Thus, consider this a mutual non-disclosure Agreement. Any confidential information shared by Canadian Global Consultants Participants or any representative of Canadian Global Consultants is confidential, proprietary, and and belongs solely and exclusively to the Client or representative who discloses it. Parties agree not to disclose, reveal, or make use of any confidential information or any transactions during discussions, in the forum or otherwise.

Client agrees not to use such confidential information in any manner other than in discussion with other Clients, or Michael, during the respective program. Confidential information includes, but is not limited to, information disclosed in connection with this Agreement, and shall not include information rightfully obtained from a third party.

Both Parties will keep private information in strictest confidence and shall use their best efforts to safeguard the confidential information and to protect it against disclosure, misuse, espionage, loss, and theft.

Client agrees not to violate the Publicity or Privacy Rights belonging to Canadian Global Consultants. Furthermore, Client will NOT reveal any information to a third party obtained in connection with this Agreement or our direct or indirect dealings with Client, including but not limited to, names, email addresses, third-party company titles or positions, phone numbers, or postal addresses. Additionally, Client will not, at any time, either directly or indirectly, disclose confidential information to any third party.

By purchasing our products, you agree that if you violate or display any likelihood of violating this Agreement, Canadian Global Consultants and/or the other program participant(s) will be entitled to injunctive relief to prohibit any such violations to protect against the harm of such violations.

CLIENT RESPONSIBILITY

Products developed by Canadian Global Consultants are for strictly educational purposes ONLY. Client accepts and agrees that Client is 100% responsible for their progress and results from products developed by Canadian Global Consultants. Canadian Global Consultants makes no representations, warranties, or guarantees verbally or in writing. Client understands that because of the nature of products developed by Mic and their extent, the results experienced by each Client may significantly vary. Client acknowledges that, there is no guarantee that Client will reach their goals as a result of participation in products developed by Canadian Global Consultants. Canadian Global Consultants program education and information is intended for a general audience and does not purport to be, nor should it be construed as, specific advice tailored to any individual. Canadian Global Consultants assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions that may appear in any program materials.

MISCELLANEOUS

LIMITATION OF LIABILITY

Client agrees they used Company’s services at their own risk and that Program is only an educational service being provided. Client releases Company, its officers, employees, directors, subsidiaries, principals, agents, heirs, executors, administrators, successors, assigns, Instructors, guides, staff, Participants, and related entities any way as well as the venue where the Programs are being held (if applicable) and any of its owners, executives, agents, or staff (sometimes referred to as “Releasees”) from any and all damages that may result from any claims arising from any Agreements, all actions, causes of action, contracts, claims, suits, costs, demands and damages of whatever nature or kind in law or in equity arising from my participation in the Programs. Client accepts any and all risks, foreseeable or unforeseeable. Client agrees that Company will not be held liable for any damages of any kind resulting or arising from including but not limited to; direct, indirect, incidental, special, negligent, consequential, or exemplary damages happening from the use or misuse of Company’s services or enrollment in the Program. Company assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions that may appear in any of the program materials.

NON-DISPARAGEMENT

The Parties agree and accept that the only venue for resolving such a dispute shall be in the venue set forth herein below. The Parties agree that they neither will engage in any conduct or communications with a third party, public or private, designed to disparage the other. Neither Client nor any of Client’s associates, employees or affiliates will directly or indirectly, in any capacity or manner, make, express, transmit speak, write, verbalize or otherwise communicate in any way (or cause, further, assist, solicit, encourage, support or participate in any of the foregoing), any remark, comment, message, information, declaration, communication or other statement of any kind, whether verbal, in writing, electronically transferred or otherwise, that might reasonably be construed to be derogatory or critical of, or negative toward, the Company or any of its programs, members, owner directors, officers, affiliates, subsidiaries, employees, agents or representatives.

INDEMNIFICATION

Client shall defend, indemnify, and hold harmless Company, Company’s officers, employers, employees, contractors, directors, related entities, trustees, affiliates, and successors from and against any and all liabilities and expense whatsoever – including without limitation, claims, damages, judgments, awards, settlements, investigations, costs, attorneys fees, and disbursements – which any of them may incur or become obligated to pay arising out of or resulting from the offering for sale, the sale, and/or use of the product(s), excluding, however, any such expenses and liabilities which may result from a breach of this Agreement or sole negligence or willful misconduct by Company, or any of its shareholders, trustees, affiliates or successors. Client shall defend Company in any legal actions, regulatory actions, or the like arising from or related to this Agreement. Client recognizes and agrees that all of the Company’s shareholders, trustees, affiliates and successors shall not be held personally responsible or liable for any actions or representations of the Company. In consideration of and as part of Client’s payment for the right to participate in Canadian Global Consultants Programs, the undersigned, your heirs, executors, administrators, successors and assigns do hereby release, waive, acquit, discharge, indemnify, defend, hold harmless and forever discharge Canadian Global Consultants and its subsidiaries, principals, directors, employees, agents, heirs, executors, administrators, successors, and assigns and any of the training instructors, guides, staff or students taking part in the training in any way as well as the venue where the Programs are being held (if applicable) and any of its owners, executives, agents, or staff (sometimes referred to as “Releasees”) of and from all actions, causes of action, contracts, claims, suits, costs, demands and damages of whatever nature or kind in law or in equity arising from my participation in the Programs.

NO TRANSFER OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

Company’s Programs are copyrighted and original materials that have been provided to Client are for Client’s individual use only and a single-user license. Client is not authorized to use any of Company’s intellectual property for Client’s business purposes. All intellectual property, including Company’s copyrighted program and/or course materials, shall remain the sole property of the Canadian Global Consultants. No license to sell or distribute Company’s materials is granted or implied. By purchasing this product, Client agrees (1) not to infringe any copyright, patent, trademark, trade secret, or other intellectual property rights, (2) that any Confidential Information shared by the Company is confidential and proprietary, and belongs solely and exclusively to the Company, (3) Client agrees not to disclose such information to any other person or use it in any manner other than in discussion with the Company. Further, by purchasing this product, Client agrees that if Client violates, or displays any likelihood of violating, any of Client’s Agreements contained in this paragraph, the Company will be entitled to injunctive relief to prohibit any such violations and to protect against the harm of such violations.

INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR STATUS

Nothing in this Agreement is to be construed as creating a partnership, venture alliance, or any other similar relationship. Each party shall be an independent contractor in its performance hereunder and shall retain control over its personnel and the manner in which such personnel perform hereunder. In no event shall such persons be deemed employees of the other party by virtue of participation or performance hereunder.

FORCE MAJEURE

In the event that any cause beyond the reasonable control of either Party, including without limitation acts of God, war, curtailment or interruption of transportation facilities, threats or acts of terrorism, State Department travel advisory, labor strike or civil disturbance, make it inadvisable, illegal, or impossible, either because of unreasonable increased costs or risk of injury, for either Company to perform its obligations under this Agreement, the Company’s performance shall be extended without liability for the period of delay or inability to perform due to such occurrence.

SEVERABILITY/WAIVER

If any provision of this Agreement is held by to be invalid or unenforceable, the remaining provisions shall nevertheless continue in full force. The failure of either Party to exercise any right provided for herein will not be deemed a waiver of that right or any further rights hereunder.

ASSIGNMENT

Client may not assign this Agreement without express written consent of Company.

MODIFICATION

Company may modify terms of this Agreement at any time. All modifications shall be posted on the Program’s website and purchasers shall be notified.

TERMINATION

Company is committed to providing all Clients in the Program with a positive Program experience. By purchasing this product, Client agrees that the Company may, at its sole discretion, terminate this Agreement, and limit, suspend, or terminate Client’s participation in the Program without refund or forgiveness of monthly payments if Client becomes disruptive to Company or Participants, Client fails to follow the Program guidelines, is difficult to work with, impairs the participation of the other Participants in the Program or upon violation of the terms as determined by Company. Client will still be liable to pay the total contract amount.

RESOLUTION OF DISPUTES

If not resolved first by good-faith negotiation between the Parties, every controversy or dispute relating to this Agreement will be submitted to the American Arbitration Association. All claims against Company must be lodged within 100-days of the date of the first claim or otherwise be forfeited forever. The arbitration shall occur within ninety (90) days from the date of the initial arbitration demand. The Parties shall cooperate to ensure that the arbitration process is completed within the ninety (90) day period. The Parties shall cooperate in exchanging and expediting discovery as part of the arbitration process. The written decision of the arbitrators (which will provide for the payment of costs) will be absolutely binding and conclusive and not subject to judicial review, and may be entered and enforced in any court of proper jurisdiction, either as a judgment of law or a decree in equity, as circumstances may indicate. In disputes involving unpaid balances on behalf of Client, Client is responsible for any and all arbitration and attorney fees.

EQUITABLE RELIEF

In the event that a dispute arises between the Parties for which monetary relief is inadequate and where a Party may suffer irreparable harm in the absence of an appropriate remedy, the injured Party may apply to any court of competent jurisdiction for equitable relief, including without limitation a temporary restraining order or injunction.

NOTICES

Any notices to be given hereunder by either Party to the other may be effected by personal delivery or by mail, registered or certified, postage prepaid with return receipt requested. Notices delivered personally shall be deemed communicated as of the date of actual receipt; mailed notices shall be deemed communicated as of three (3) days after the date of mailing. For purposes of this Agreement, “personal delivery” includes notice transmitted by fax or email. Email: info[at]goingproyoga[dot]com. This Agreement shall be binding upon and inure to the benefit of the Parties hereto, their respective heirs, executors, administrators, successors and permitted assigns. Any breach or the failure to enforce any provision hereof shall not constitute a waiver of that or any other provision in any other circumstance.This Agreement constitutes and contains the entire Agreement between the Parties with respect to its subject matter, supersedes all previous discussions, negotiations, proposals, Agreements and understandings between them relating to such subject matter. This Agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of California, United States of America.

EARNINGS DISCLAIMER:

EVERY EFFORT HAS BEEN MADE TO ACCURATELY REPRESENT OUR PRODUCTS AND THEIR POTENTIAL. EVEN THOUGH THIS INDUSTRY IS ONE OF THE FEW WHERE ONE CAN WRITE THEIR OWN CHECK IN TERMS OF EARNINGS, THERE IS NO GUARANTEE THAT YOU WILL EARN ANY MONEY USING THE TECHNIQUES AND IDEAS IN THESE MATERIALS. EXAMPLES IN THESE MATERIALS ARE NOT TO BE INTERPRETED AS A PROMISE OR GUARANTEE OF EARNINGS. EARNING POTENTIAL IS ENTIRELY DEPENDENT ON THE PERSON USING OUR PRODUCTS, IDEAS, AND TECHNIQUES. WE DO NOT PURPORT ANY OF OUR PRODUCTS TO BE A “GET RICH SCHEME.”

ANY CLAIMS MADE OF ACTUAL EARNINGS OR EXAMPLES OF ACTUAL RESULTS CAN BE VERIFIED UPON REQUEST. YOUR LEVEL OF SUCCESS IN ATTAINING THE RESULTS CLAIMED IN OUR MATERIALS DEPENDS ON THE TIME YOU DEVOTE TO OUR PROGRAMS, IDEAS, AND TECHNIQUES MENTIONED, YOUR FINANCES, KNOWLEDGE, AND VARIOUS SKILLS. SINCE THESE FACTORS DIFFER ACCORDING TO THE INDIVIDUAL, WE CANNOT GUARANTEE YOUR SUCCESS OR INCOME LEVEL, NOR ARE WE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY OF YOUR ACTIONS.

MATERIALS IN OUR PRODUCTS AND ON OUR WEBSITE MAY CONTAIN INFORMATION THAT INCLUDES, OR IS BASED UPON, FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS WITHIN THE MEANING OF THE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995. FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS GIVE OUR EXPECTATIONS OR FORECASTS OF FUTURE EVENTS. YOU CAN IDENTIFY THESE STATEMENTS BY THE FACT THAT THEY DO NOT RELATE STRICTLY TO HISTORICAL OR CURRENT FACTS. THEY USE WORDS SUCH AS “ANTICIPATE,” “ESTIMATE,” “EXPECT,” “PROJECT,” “INTEND,” “PLAN,” “BELIEVE,” AND OTHER WORDS AND TERMS OF SIMILAR MEANING IN CONNECTION WITH A DESCRIPTION OF POTENTIAL EARNINGS OR FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE.

ANY AND ALL FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS HERE, OR ON ANY OF OUR SALES MATERIALS, ARE INTENDED TO EXPRESS OUR OPINION OF EARNINGS POTENTIAL. MANY FACTORS ARE IMPORTANT IN DETERMINING YOUR ACTUAL RESULTS AND NO GUARANTEES ARE MADE THAT YOU WILL ACHIEVE RESULTS SIMILAR TO OURS OR THE TESTIMONIALS OF OUR CLIENTS. IN FACT, NO GUARANTEES ARE MADE THAT YOU WILL ACHIEVE ANY RESULTS FROM THE IDEAS AND TECHNIQUES IN OUR MATERIAL.

Each pose has multiple benefits, but we highlight the Primary Benefit to indicate its main purpose. This helps focus cueing more specifically and effectively towards achieving this benefit.

Additionally, it helps us understand how the pose prepares specific areas of the body for more challenging Level 2 or Level 3 postures.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm .

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the multifidus along the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull just under the chin.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

 

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist. 

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL)

This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into adduction or extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: wrist flexors, biceps, pectoralis minor

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Muscle areas of the back line include: triceps, rotator cuff muscles of external rotation and rhomboids.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Back Arm Line (BAL)

The Back Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consist of the Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL) and the Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL).

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Priority #1-2 Cues – Movement into Pose/Gentle stability:

Used to move the student(s) into the pose. These cues are the first thing to say to guide movement into the posture combine with occasionally cues for action to stabilize and protect the body.

Action cues are subtle movements in that establish stability to support the posture and protect the body.

These cues are necessary for beginners.

Front Arm Lines (FAL)

The Front Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consists of the Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL) and the Superficial Front Arm Line (SFAL).

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion. This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The SFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, flexion, and protraction. This fascial line runs from the clavicle, through the inner biceps, and into the front forearm area.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into abduction, adduction in combination with flexion or extension.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: inner thigh muscles, the hip flexors (Psoas), the deep core including Quadratus Lumborum (QL), and the transversus abdominus.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

Assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the muscles on the front and sides of the shins, the muscles on the side of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the side abdominals (obliques), and the spinal muscles on each side of the neck.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

Assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the shins, the quadriceps, the abdomens, the diaphragm and the muscles in the front of the neck.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spinal muscles.

Priority #1-2 Cues – Movement into Pose combined with Adjusting Common Misalignments:

This yoga pose is more complex and requires a combination of action cues to stabilize the body before moving into the full expression of the pose.

Action cues are subtle movements in that establish stability to support the posture and protect the body.

Priority #3 Cues – Finishing Touches:

Used for the final touches of the pose. These are the last things you would say after a student has entered the pose (#1) and established alignment(#2).

Priority #2 Cues – Adjust Common Misalignments:

Used to adjust common misalignment in the body by providing action cues. Action cues are subtle movements in that establish stability to support the posture and protect the body.

Priority #1 Cues – Movement into the Pose:

Used to move the student(s) into the pose. These cues are the first thing to say to guide movement into the posture. These cues are necessary for beginners.

Priority #3 Cues – Soft Finishing Touches:

Used for the final touches of the pose. These are the last things you would say after a student has safely entered the pose to reconnect with their breath, to create awareness, and to relax their body

Sanskrit Cheat Sheet
Adhodownward
Agnifire
Anandahappiness or bliss
Angalimb
Anghustabig toe
Apanadescending energy
Ardhahalf
Asanapose/ posture
Ashtaeight
Baddhatied/ bound
Bakacrane
Balayoung, powerful, child-like
Bhadrafortune, or auspicious
Bharmatable
Bhujaarm
Bhujangasnake/ serpent
Bitila/Gocow
Camatsurprised, proud
Chandramoon
Chaturfour
Dandarod/ staff
Dandayamanabalancing
Dhanubow
Dvijasanaborn twice
Dwitwo, both
Ekaone
Galavadevotion
Halaplough
HanumanMonkey king
Hastahand
Indralord or king
Januknee
Kakacrow
Kapotapigeon/ dove
KaraHand
Karnaear
Konaangle
Kurmaturtle
Loladangling
Malagarland or prayer beads
Mandukfrog
Marjaracat
Matsyafish
Mudraseal
Mukhaface
Natadancer
Navaboat

Terms and Conditions

Nirlambawithout support
Padafoot/ leg
PadmaLotus
Parighagate latch
Parivrttarevolved
ParsvaSide
Paschimawest direction (back of body)
PhalakaShield, holding
Pidapressure
Pranabreath/ lifeforce
PrapaBegin to drink, prayer
Prasaritaspread out
Pristhaback or rear
Purvaeast direction (front of body)
Rajaking
Salambawith support
Sarvangawhole body
Savacorpse
Setubridge
Shalabhalocust/ grasshopper
Shishopuppy
Sirsahead
Skandatrunk, stem or bulk of quanitity
Stambhapillar or column
Sthitistability
Sukhaeasy
Suptareclining/ sleeping
Suryasun
Svanadog
Svargaheaven
Tadamountain
Tittibhasmall insect
Trithree
Upavisthaseated
Urdvaraised/ upward
Ustracamel
Utkatafierce, proud, superior, difficult
Uttanaintense stretch
Utthitaextended, stretched.
VajraThunderbolt
Vakrabent
Vasisthawealthy
ViparitaReverse
Virahero
Vrksatree
Vrschikascorpion
Vyaghratiger

**Modifications: Adjustments made to a yoga posture
to suit the needs and abilities of the practitioner. Modifications can make a pose more accessible for beginners, individuals with injuries, or those with limited flexibility or strength.

**Variations: Alternative versions of a yoga posture that will either increase the challenge or level of intensity and can also help to target specific areas of the body more effectively.

Front Arm Lines (FAL)

The Front Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consists of the Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL) and the Superficial Front Arm Line (SFAL).

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion. This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The SFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, flexion, and protraction. This fascial line runs from the clavicle, through the inner biceps, and into the front forearm area.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into abduction, adduction in combination with flexion or extension.

To safely perform any Level 2 or Level 3 poses, specific warm-ups are required:

Stretch involves lengthening muscles and connective tissues to increase flexibility and range of motion.

Activate refers to engaging and recruiting specific muscles to prepare them for movement or pose.

When the (2X) label is present, at least two different poses, or exercises, are needed to adequately prepare the muscles. Can be applied to either stretching or activating.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the mid-line of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the mid-line of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

Assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the shins, the quadriceps, the abdomens, the diaphragm and the muscles in the front of the neck.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spinal muscles.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

Assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body.

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the muscles along the sides of the shins (peroneals), the muscles outside of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the glute muscles, the side abdominals (obliques), and the side of the neck (scalenes).

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm .

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

Assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the muscles on the front and sides of the shins, the muscles on the side of the thighs including the Iliotibial (IT) band, the side abdominals (obliques), and the spinal muscles on each side of the neck.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: inner thigh muscles, the hip flexors (Psoas), the deep core including Quadratus Lumborum (QL), and the transversus abdominus.

Back Arm Line (BAL)

The Back Arm Lines assist the body in stabilization and consist of the Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL) and the Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL).

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension. This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Sanskrit Cheat Sheet
Adhodownward
Agnifire
Anandahappiness or bliss
Angalimb
Anghustabig toe
Apanadescending energy
Ardhahalf
Asanapose/ posture
Ashtaeight
Baddhatied/ bound
Bakacrane
Balayoung, powerful, child-like
Bhadrafortune, or auspicious
Bharmatable
Bhujaarm
Bhujangasnake/ serpent
Bitila/Gocow
Camatsurprised, proud
Chandramoon
Chaturfour
Dandarod/ staff
Dandayamanabalancing
Dhanubow
Dvijasanaborn twice
Dwitwo, both
Ekaone
Galavadevotion
Halaplough
HanumanMonkey king
Hastahand
Indralord or king
Januknee
Kakacrow
Kapotapigeon/ dove
KaraHand
Karnaear
Konaangle
Kurmaturtle
Loladangling
Malagarland or prayer beads
Mandukfrog
Marjaracat
Matsyafish
Mudraseal
Mukhaface
Natadancer
Navaboat

Terms and Conditions

Nirlambawithout support
Padafoot/ leg
PadmaLotus
Parighagate latch
Parivrttarevolved
ParsvaSide
Paschimawest direction (back of body)
PhalakaShield, holding
Pidapressure
Pranabreath/ lifeforce
PrapaBegin to drink, prayer
Prasaritaspread out
Pristhaback or rear
Purvaeast direction (front of body)
Rajaking
Salambawith support
Sarvangawhole body
Savacorpse
Setubridge
Shalabhalocust/ grasshopper
Shishopuppy
Sirsahead
Skandatrunk, stem or bulk of quanitity
Stambhapillar or column
Sthitistability
Sukhaeasy
Suptareclining/ sleeping
Suryasun
Svanadog
Svargaheaven
Tadamountain
Tittibhasmall insect
Trithree
Upavisthaseated
Urdvaraised/ upward
Ustracamel
Utkatafierce, proud, superior, difficult
Uttanaintense stretch
Utthitaextended, stretched.
VajraThunderbolt
Vakrabent
Vasisthawealthy
ViparitaReverse
Virahero
Vrksatree
Vrschikascorpion
Vyaghratiger

Deep Back Arm Line (DBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the deep muscles in the back and shoulder area, and into the back of the forearms.

The DBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Muscle areas of the back line include: triceps, rotator cuff muscles of external rotation and rhomboids.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Arm Line (DFAL)

This fascial line runs from the area underneath your chest, up the armpit, and connects to the biceps.

The DFAL assists the upper body to move in adduction, rotation, and flexion.

To lengthen the front arm lines, you need to move your body into adduction or extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: wrist flexors, biceps, pectoralis minor

Lateral Line (LL)

This fascial line runs from the base of the outer ankles, up the side of the body, to the base of the skull region underneath the ear.

The Lateral Line assists the body to move sideways, in abduction, for example to stretch the side body. 

To lengthen the lateral line, you need to move your body to one side so that you can stretch the other side.

Muscle areas of the lateral line include: the IT band, glute muscles, and obliques.

 

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist. 

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

 

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

The Superficial Back Line assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine. 

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the spine.

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion.

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

 

Deep Front Line (DFL)

This fascial line is composed of the deep inner thighs, hip flexors, deep core and the diaphragm.

Assists the body with core stability, primarily to move in flexion and hip abduction.

To lengthen the deep front line, you need to stimulate these deeper layers of tissue in the body with long holds that target the inner thighs.

Muscle areas of the deep front line include: Adductor Longus, Psoas, Quadratus Lumborum, and the abdominals.

Superficial Back Line (SBL)

This fascial line runs from the bottoms of the feet, up the back of the body, to the third eye.

It assists the body to move in extension, for example to arch the spine.

To lengthen the back line, you need to move your body into a forward flexion.

Muscle areas of the back line include: calves, hamstring, and the multifidus along the spine.

 

Superficial Front Line (SFL)

This fascial line runs from the tops of the feet, along the anterior side of the body, up to the base of the skull just under the chin.

The Superficial Front Line assists the body to move forward, in flexion. 

To lengthen the front line, you need to move your body backwards, into extension.

Muscle areas of the front line include: the quadriceps, abdomens, intercostals and diaphragm.

Spiral Line (SL)

This fascial line loops around the body, across the upper back to the opposite shoulder, and around the ribs to cross again at the front.

The Spiral Line assists the body to rotate and twist.

To lengthen the spiral line, you need to move your body in circular and twisting motions.

Muscle areas of the spiral line include: the IT band, obliques, and the spine.

 

Superficial Back Arm Line (SBAL)

This fascial line runs from the midline of the back body, through the trapezius and tricep area, and into the back of the forearms.

The SBAL assists the body to move in abduction, rotation, and extension.

To lengthen the back arm lines, you need to move your body into flexion, adduction, or protraction.

Level 1 pose: Safe to perform in the average body and can be added to the beginning, middle or end of a sequence. No warm up needed.

Level 2 pose: Requires one or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up, or activated, using a level 1 pose. These postures are recommended after the warm up to the middle/end of a sequence.

Level 3 pose: Requires two or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up or activated, using a level 1 or level 2 pose. These postures are recommended for middle to end of a sequence.

View on “More” tab: Warm up poses for this posture

*Yoga Pose Levels are based on what’s accessible for the average modern body.

Level 1 pose: Safe to perform in the average body and can be added to the beginning, middle or end of a sequence. No warm up needed.

Level 2 pose: Requires one or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up, or activated, using a level 1 pose. These postures are recommended after the warm up to the middle/end of a sequence.

Level 3 pose: Requires two or more areas of the body to be prepared, warmed up or activated, using a level 1 or level 2 pose. These postures are recommended for middle to end of a sequence.

View on “More” tab: Warm up poses for this posture

*Yoga Pose Levels are based on what’s accessible for the average modern body.